How We Can Overcome the Sad, but True Nature of Blogger Attrition

amelia phoenix desertsong

Two years ago, I made a big decision to simply shut down my blogs and social media. There were many motivations behind it. The chief one was due to some serious issues I was having with Facebook. Without getting into those too much, I was essentially driven offline by both life circumstances and a lack of anything good to say anymore.

As it turns out, I was not alone in this. I did attempt a comeback a few months ago, under a different name. But, the drive wasn’t there.

So, what finally brought me back? It was actually a need to make something of my archives, actually. I was tired of watching them gather dust. 

As I’ve returned, there’s a whole new generation of bloggers just starting out. Many from two years ago are now long gone. I don’t necessarily know why. But, as I was going through some old blogger interviews I did, it became really sad for me to realize that not only were many of them no longer blogging, they’d disappeared entirely from the internet pretty much.

After the first one, I felt sad. After the second one, I felt much more sad. The third one in a row actually broke my heart. With each blogger I find no longer even participating at all online, the more heartbroken I’ve gotten.

Unfortunately, it’s sad but true that most bloggers, vloggers, and other content creators do eventually give up. Maybe audience growth has stalled, revenue simply dried up, or the passion just wasn’t there any more. You need an immense drive to continue the absolute grind of content creation. If you want to be read or seen, that is.

Between social media management, search engine optimization, constant interactions, link building… it gets to be all quite overwhelming. That’s why I decided to start over with a fresh slate and take my time with it. The thing I’m focusing on is simply getting content posted. 

I’m not always promoting them right away or even finding proper photos to complement them. I just need to get everything back up and organized all in one spot.Then, once the archive is built up, then I can start promoting. Then, I can start reaching out to build links. I’m hoping that some of it all will take care of itself naturally, and I can prune and weed out as necessary.

If you’re thinking of giving up on content creation, take a step back for a moment. If you’re that overwhelmed, think about the one thing you enjoy doing most. Cut everything else for a little bit and just focus on that one thing. 

It may be creating Pinterest pins, or participating in Facebook groups, or engaging in Twitter chats. It may simply be the act of writing itself. Put everything else aside for now and focus on your favorite activity. Then, get the best at what you can with that one thing, and then move onto the next thing you feel ready to dive into. 

That’s why I’m just dropping blog posts like crazy. I’m focusing my whole energy on rewriting and creating new posts. The beauty of the internet is that I can layer things on as I go. I’m trying to think of content creation as building a really super awesome cake.

Yum, cake.

What is your favorite part of content creation? Is it the creation itself, the promotion, or the interaction? Let me know!

~ Amelia <3

Writing words, spreading love <3 Owner/operator of Content Revival (www.content-revival.com)

2 thoughts on “How We Can Overcome the Sad, but True Nature of Blogger Attrition

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge
Back To Top
%d bloggers like this: